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Coventry University

Analytical Chemistry and Forensic Science

UCAS Code: FF14

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

B,B,C

to include Chemistry or Biology. Excludes General Studies.

The Access to HE Diploma to include 30 Level 3 credits at Merit of which 15 must be in Biology or Chemistry units. Plus GCSE English and Mathematics at grade 4 / C or above.

GCSE/National 4/National 5

5 GCSEs at grade 4 / C or above to include English, Mathematics and two Sciences.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

30

to include 5 points in Biology or Chemistry at Higher level.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

DMM

in a Biological or Chemical Science subject.

UCAS Tariff

112

We've calculated how many Ucas points you'll need for this course.

80%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Other options

4.0 years | Sandwich | 2020

Subjects

Forensic science

Analytical chemistry

In laboratory sessions, we cover key experimental techniques and develop essential lab, data handling, reporting and broader scientific skills, such as literature researching, information technology, bioinformatics, data processing and the use of statistics. The course is underpinned with practical experience, enabling students to participate in ‘real-life’ simulated situations within our dedicated video-linked crime scene house or mock court room, for example. There is also the opportunity to become familiar with a wide range of other academic disciplines, including cell structures and function, biochemistry and genetics, which play a key role in the forensic arena.

You’ll be taught by our experienced staff, many of whom bring professional or research expertise to their teaching in the areas of toxicology, environmental analysis, pharmacology, biochemistry, genomic and molecular biology, as well as highly specialist areas such as footwear analysis and sensor design. They have held roles as quality assurance managers in major pharmaceuticals companies, such as GSK and British Biotech, as forensic scientists in the Forensic Science Service or as analytical scientists in government laboratories.

You will have the chance to conduct research alongside members of staff or the many professional organisations we have links with – such as Leicester Royal Infirmary, Key Forensic Services Ltd, Nemaura Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Nicholls Colton, West Midlands Police and Excilica, a chemistry company that was set up by Coventry University.

**Benefits**

* Support applying for short and long-term placements in laboratory and industrial settings.

* Scene of crime outfit, basic fingerprint kit, laboratory coat and safety spectacles provided for use.High levels of student satisfaction.

* Regular guest speakers have previously included: Derek Forrest OBE, Interpol’s lead on Disaster Victim Identification; a former student now working as a DNA analyst and a forensic scientist with many years’ experience of presenting evidence in court.

* Many of our staff are professionally recognised as accredited as Chartered Chemists by the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), Chartered Biologists by the Royal Society of Biology (RSB) and are professional members of the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences (CSFS).

* Hands-on experience of a wide range of laboratory technique techniques including High Performance Liquid Chromatography, Gas chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, UV and IR Spectrometry, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, Capillary Electrophoresis, gene amplification using PCR and Gene Sequencing (DNA17). *Strong network of professional agencies and potential employers and excellent research links with Key Forensic Services Ltd and LGC Forensics Ltd, whose practising forensic scientists have previously provided guest lectures and workshops to help students prepare themselves for the real-world experience of forensic science, as well as specific topics for final year research projects.

Modules

Our main study themes are:

**Chemical analysis**: We deal with the important areas of sampling, sample preparation, extraction techniques and analysis in the analytical sciences. The quantitative aspects of spectrometry, chromatography and electrophoresis will be emphasised. We will examine the various processes and techniques involved and their possible uses in analysis of a wide variety of chemical and biological materials including foods, environmental and pharmaceutical samples within industrial and manufacturing environments.

**Forensic science**: Covers crime scene protocols for recovery, physical, biological and chemical techniques for analysis, statistical interpretation and legal aspects governing presentation of evidence for the criminal justice system. Techniques covered range from ‘spot tests’ for blood, drugs and firearm residues to the development of latent fingerprints, the identification of glass and paint fragments and the microscopic examination of hairs and fibres.

**Biology for chemists**: Covers key biological principles including the structure and activities of both prokaryotic (bacterial) and eukaryotic cells, the structure and function of biological macromolecules, enzymes and metabolic pathways, and genetic inheritance. These concepts are vital for understanding of key techniques employed in forensic science such as DNA analysis.

**Laboratory competence**: Generic and specialised skills in experimental biology, including experimentation and measurements on humans, anti-contamination and audit trail procedures, safety (eg. key laboratory skills and competencies, good laboratory practice) and ethical considerations.
Research methods: Critical analysis, reflection, information searching and experimental design in the Analytical Chemistry and Forensic Sciences. Data collection, analysis and presentation.

For details about individual modules please visit the course page on our website.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£9,250
per year
EU
£9,250
per year
Northern Ireland
£9,250
per year
Scotland
£9,250
per year
Wales
£9,250
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Coventry University

Department:

School of Life Sciences

TEF rating:

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

75%
med
Forensic science
69%
low
Analytical chemistry

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Forensic and archaeological sciences

Teaching and learning

86%
Staff make the subject interesting
90%
Staff are good at explaining things
80%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
75%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

91%
Library resources
94%
IT resources
87%
Course specific equipment and facilities
70%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

75%
UK students
25%
International students
37%
Male students
63%
Female students
72%
2:1 or above
3%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
C
B

Chemistry

Teaching and learning

88%
Staff make the subject interesting
92%
Staff are good at explaining things
62%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
77%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

92%
Library resources
96%
IT resources
80%
Course specific equipment and facilities
58%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

Who studies this subject and how do they get on?

69%
UK students
31%
International students
54%
Male students
46%
Female students
74%
2:1 or above
4%
Drop out rate

Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)

C
B
C

After graduation


The stats in this section relate to the general subject area/s at this university – not this specific course. We show this where there isn't enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Forensic and archaeological sciences

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£18,500
med
Average annual salary
100%
high
Employed or in further education
100%
med
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

14%
Science, engineering and production technicians
10%
Business, finance and related associate professionals
9%
Other elementary services occupations
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

The statistics here primarily reflect the prospects for forensic science graduates - they make up over three quarters of the group. While there are not a lot of jobs available in forensics itself just at the moment, reflected in the overall unemployment rates for forensic science graduates, there are still jobs for graduates from these subjects as they learn useful analysis techniques that some employers can find in short supply. Last year's graduates went into analysis work in labs, technician roles and general research, and for those looking a little wider, business roles and management also employed forensics graduates. Some graduates join the police with this degree and that can be a good source of sponsorship and work experience.

Chemistry

What are graduates doing after six months?

This is what graduates told us they were doing (and earning), shortly after completing their course. We've crunched the numbers to show you if these immediate prospects are high, medium or low, compared to those studying this subject/s at other universities.

£18,720
low
Average annual salary
98%
high
Employed or in further education
100%
high
Employed in a role where degree was essential or beneficial

Top job areas of graduates

14%
Other elementary services occupations
13%
Science, engineering and production technicians
11%
Sales assistants and retail cashiers
What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

Chemistry graduates are in demand from a wide range of industries, from the food, oil, chemicals and pharmaceuticals to consultancy, technical analysis and teaching. They're also prized by business and finance employers for their research and data handling skills — anywhere there is research and data to be explained, you can find chemistry grads. If you want a career in research, you need a doctorate, so start planning now if you fancy one of these exciting and challenging jobs - but good students can usually get grants to take a doctorate, so don't worry about the financing if you think you have what it takes. The recession wasn’t too kind to chemists, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry (one of the key employers for chemists), but things are getting back to normal for this flexible group and it's one of the few degrees that is bucking the current trend and increasing graduate numbers.

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Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF):

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This information comes from the National Student Survey, an annual student survey of final-year students. You can use this to see how satisfied students studying this subject area at this university, are (not the individual course).

We calculate a mean rating of all responses to indicate whether this is high, medium or low compared to the same subject area at other universities.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

Have a question about this info? Learn more here

Graduate field commentary:

The Higher Education Careers Services Unit have provided some further context for all graduates in this subject area, including details that numbers alone might not show

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

Have a question about this info? Learn more here