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Cornwall College

Wildlife Education and Media

UCAS Code: XP33

Foundation Degree in Science - FdSc

Entry requirements


A level

D,D

At least 32 points must be at A2 level when considered alongside AS levels.

Pass Access to HE with at least 45 credits at level 3, Merits and Distinctions may be required for particular subjects.

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme

24

A minimum of 48 tariff points in total from appropriate subjects.

PPP grades in an appropriate subject.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

PPP

In an appropriate subject.

A minimum of 48 tariff points in total from appropriate subjects.

UCAS Tariff

48

From acceptable level 3 qualifications. Plus GCSEs at grade C/grade 4 or above in English Language, Science and Mathematics: alternatives at Level 2 may be considered.

100%
Applicants receiving offers

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

2years

Full-time | 2019

Other options

4 years | Part-time | 2019

Take a look at the device you are reading this on. It is the final result of mathematical theory, engineering know-how, scientific understanding and technological inspiration. It is fused with design and art so it appeals to your sense of aesthetics and emotion. It allows you to be creative. So should a degree course.

Global problems require an ability to understand a range of subjects and combine them to propose global solutions. This is the case for conservation. Understanding conservation science is one thing but explaining it to the general public is quite another. Most conservation science jobs require these skills: educators in zoos, aquariums and nature reserves, science journalists, wildlife media creators, wildlife guides, wildlife campaign managers, project coordinators, fundraisers for charities. The FdSc Wildlife Education and Media course does just that. It teaches you the conservation science that makes you a conservation scientist but it also provides skills in educating a range of audiences, both in person and through a range of media.

It is a theoretical course but it is also practical and applied: Pop-Up Nature Centres, British Science Week activity, interpretation development, storytelling, writing journalistic copy, producing films and podcasts. You don’t just learn but do. Employers like and need that approach, and this is why this course has been successful in getting graduates into jobs, especially if you complete our one-year top-up in BSc (Hons) Applied Zoology. You produce a portfolio to evidence your skills and learn industry standard software. We guide you to become more employable.

The course includes:

- Learning scientific subjects including ecology, zoology, biodiversity, evolution, animal behaviour and species/habitat conservation

- Developing environmental interpretation for use by the public

- Learning to teach through running our dedicated pop-up nature centre

- Planning and running an educational event for British Science Week

- Learning to use digital cameras for wildlife photography/film-making and industry-standard specialist software for media creation

- Developing independent research skills in a second year project in conservation science, education and/or media.

The course can be carried out on a full time basis, which is 2 years at our Newquay campus next to Newquay Zoo, or on a part time basis over 3/4 years, where you will be taught with full time students.

**Progression**

- If you want to stay at Newquay after your FdSc, you could progress onto our BSc (Hons) Applied Zoology top-up. This means you would get a BSc (Hons) qualification in 3 years – **exactly the same amount of time as if you picked a BSc qualification from the start.**

- You could also progress onto the BSc (Hons) Environmental Resource Management, a 1 year top-up that is based at Newquay.

- You could progress onto the 1 year BSc (Hons) Animal Conservation Science top-up at Plymouth University.

**Careers**

The Wildlife Education and Media course is an ideal platform to pursue these potential careers:

- Wildlife education officer in zoos, wildlife parks, aquariums and nature reserves

- Education officer in museums, particularly in natural history sections

- Wildlife tour guides leading holiday expeditions for ecotourism companies

- Teaching/instructing for outdoor education providers

- Ranger for outdoor organisations

- Education officer for wildlife charities

- Media relations officer

- Science journalism

- Wildlife campaigns manager

- Teaching science, particularly biology, in primary and secondary schools (would also require a PGCE).

Modules

Indicative Modules Year 1: - Wildlife Education - Wildlife & the Media - Evolutionary Theories – Animals and their Environment - Introduction to Zoology - Fieldwork Techniques - Personal & Employability Skills Development. Indicative Modules Year 2: - Education & Interpretation in Public Spaces – Wildlife Education and Media in Practice - Communicating Science & Natural History - Vertebrate Zoology & Conservation - Individual Research Project – One optional module from: Behavioural Ecology – Primate Behaviour and Conservation – Marine Vertebrate Biology and Conservation.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£9,950
per year
England
£8,600
per year
EU
£8,600
per year
International
£9,950
per year
Northern Ireland
£8,600
per year
Scotland
£8,600
per year
Wales
£8,600
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Cornwall College Newquay

Department:

Animals, Horticulture, Land-Use and Food

TEF rating:

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