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BSc (Hons) 3 years full-time 2017
BSc (Hons) 5 years part-time 2017
Ucas points guide

96

% applicants receiving offers

100%

Subjects
  • Science of aquatic & terrestrial environments
Student score
Not Available
% employed or in further study
Not Available
Average graduate salary
Not Available
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
Not Available

Scottish Highers
Not Available

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

UCAS tariff points
96

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 96 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

100%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,250

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

From the ice wastes of the Antarctic, to the sultry heat of the tropical rain forest, to the incredible biodiversity of a chalk downland in Kent, there is an immense diversity of organisms and geography. Life on the planet (the biosphere) has survived for three thousand million years because of an intricate set of relationships which link water, land and atmosphere. These relationships are now being analysed and modelled by environmental scientists. As we understand more about these relationships, we can respond confidently to new threats such as climate change and loss of biodiversity. Canterbury Christ Church University, based at the heart of Kent (â??the garden of Englandâ??) is the perfect place for you to make a career out of your interest in the environment.

Modules

Year 1: Core modules: core science (double module); variety of life; introduction to environmental systems; the organism and its environment; microbiology and cell culture. Year 2: Core modules: control systems 1 and 2; environmental and organic chemistry; evolution; earth as a system; (plus the following optional modules); environmental development; geomorphology; introduction to geographical information systems; understanding past climate change. Year 3: Core modules: energy, society and the environment; (plus 1 from the following optional modules); practical ecology; sense and perception; ecology and conservation; ionising radiations; pollution; the countryside: change and conservation; regions of risk: human and environmental security; advanced geographical information systems; applied physical geography: climate and society; individual study.

Canterbury Christ Church University

Canterbury Cathedral

We're a non-traditional university with an open and welcoming environment - everyone feels at home in our historic settings. Canterbury, our main campus, is a World Heritage Site and one of the safest university cities in England and Wales. As well as a wide range of exciting courses, there is loads to see and do outside of your studies, with London and even France easily accessible for a day trip. Canterbury: think history, great teaching and an unrivalled student experience.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
30%
70%

Year 1

28%
72%

Year 2

30%
70%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
30%
70%

Year 1

28%
72%

Year 2

7%
93%

Year 3

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction Not Available
Student score Not Available

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
6% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
24% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
0% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
309 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
60% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
23% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study Not Available
Average graduate salary Not Available

Sorry, we don't have any information about graduates from this subject here.

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
The recession has been difficult for some environmental scientists, with jobs and funding cuts, so bear that in mind when you look at the figures. This is also one of those subjects where graduates don’t usually go to London to work, so if you want to work in East Anglia or the South West – or overseas – this might be a good subject. Graduates tend to get jobs in the environment, in surveying and as lab technicians, but, like a lot of other subjects, if you want a job in research, start planning to take a doctorate. The stats also include a small number of oceanographers and meteorologists.
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