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Bradford College

Law (Accountancy)

UCAS Code: NM41

Bachelor of Law (with Honours) - LLB (Hons)

Entry requirements


A level

D,D,D-C,C,C

Overall Pass with a minimum of 45 credits at Level 3.

GCSE/National 4/National 5

Five GCSE subjects at Grade C/4 or above including English.

Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (first teaching from September 2016)

MMP-MMM

Scottish Higher

D,D-C,C

UCAS Tariff

72-96

Standard applicants should normally have a minimum of three A Levels, or equivalent, or successful completion of an accredited Access to Higher Education Course.

About this course


This course has alternative study modes. Contact the university to find out how the information below might vary.

Course option

3.0years

Full-time | 2020

Other options

4.5 years | Part-time | 2020

Subject

Accountancy

Choose from a range of Qualifying Law Degrees; the LLB (Hons) Law, LLB (Hons) Law (Social Welfare), LLB (Hons) Law (Marketing), and LLB (Hons) Law (Accountancy).

Choose a small and friendly Law School which prides itself in supporting its students.

Choose Bradford Law School, Bradford College University Centre.

Preparing you for your future whilst offering flexibility and choice are the key features to our specialist LLB Law Degrees, which are recognised as Qualifying Law Degrees by the legal professional bodies, the Solicitors Regulation Authority and Bar Council. This programme recognises the need to provide an academically challenging degree which will give you a sound knowledge of legal and accounting concepts together with an understanding of the operation of law and accountancy in society. This course is a qualifying Law degree accredited by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and Bar Council. The distinctive features of the degree are: 1) employability by the blending of professional or vocational components with traditional academic content; 2) entrepreneurship; recognising that many graduates join family firms or establish their own businesses and to enable them to do such successfully they will benefit from having a law degree but also knowledge of accountancy. The 'real world' runs through this programme in terms of its module structure and content, delivery, and assessment. With that eye on the real world, this degree recognises that not all law graduates will enter the legal professions and thereby equips them with other options. The LLB (Accountancy) would be ideal if you are wanting to work in an in-house commercial organisation where a range of subject knowledge would be invaluable. This course is also ideal if you are wanting to join a smaller legal practice, perhaps joining family members, where different skills would be valued.
This degree gives you the opportunity to study two related disciplines - Law (the major discipline) and Accountancy (the minor discipline) - to create a degree that will equip you well in a legal, business, financial, and banking sector. You will have the option of selecting from a range of law modules including, but not limited to, employment law, commercial law, and company law and accountancy modules such as business taxation, computerised accounting, personal taxation and investment, corporate taxation and financial management. Preparing you for your future career is our central concern and that preparation goes beyond the acquisition of legal knowledge to developing important skills. As a result, you have the option of undertaking Work Placement modules or Legal Skills modules. These modules focus on client counselling, advocacy, negotiation and research and writing. Skills that you will require in the legal and business world. All of our students do a final year Dissertation. We have an appropriate staff/student ratio to support this through one-to-one supervision. Within the Dissertation you are able to undertake primary research (interviews/questionnaires). This is a great experience in itself, develops new skills, and helps you stand out from the crowd. If that is not enough, we also encourage you to become authors (or co-authors with your tutors) publishing in our Law School and College journals. Our focus is on working with our students and not creating overly big classes. We are a friendly and informal Law School which prides itself on supporting you, ensuring that you graduate with the knowledge and skills required to succeed, and ensuring that you have the opportunity to make yourself stand out from the crowd. The course will prepare you for success in a variety of legal accountancy and financial management settings. As a Qualifying Law Degree, successful completion of the programme does allow you to progress onto the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course.
We look forward to welcoming you to Bradford Law School.

Modules

This degree is a qualifying law degree accredited by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and Bar Council. The programme does allow scope to study optional subjects in both law and accountancy. The options include: Work Placement; Dissertation; Family Law; Immigration Law; Employment Law; Jurisprudence (Legal Philosophy); Company Law and Evidence; Financial and Management Accounting Applications; Business Taxation; Computerised Accounting; Personal Taxation and Investment; Corporate Taxation; Financial Reporting; Financial Management; Audit and Assurance; Financial Regulation and Control. The programme employs a plurality of formative and summative assessment methods including, assignments, examinations, dissertation, presentations, assessed moots, assessed negotiations, assessed client interview, 'soap box' debates, and portfolio submission. This plurality of assessment ensures that you graduate with the skills and abilities required in employment.
Work Placement and Legal Skills are a component of this programme. Students are required to study one or the other in year 2. The Legal Skills modules are designed to replicate legal practice with students developing a portfolio (case file) on behalf of a client. In representing a client, you will conduct client and witness conferences, perform negotiations and undertake advocacy exercises as well as draft an opinion, write various correspondences and undertake legal research. These skills are transferrable to other areas - notably business. In the Work Placement modules, you will undertake the above activities with an external placement provider and under the strict supervision of a mentor. Students are encouraged to find your own placement by pursuing a traditional application process, but the Law School does have a number of placement contacts. The majority of placements are with Law Firms but we also have placements with Citizens Advice Bureaus and with the College Student Union. The placements are available in Bradford, Dewsbury, Halifax and Manchester. This enables students to perform their placements near their place of residence. Beacon Recruitment, part of the Bradford College family, and the College Health and Safety team assist academic colleagues in undertaking health and safety checks with placement providers.

Assessment methods

The programme employs a blended learning strategy where attendance in lectures, workshops and seminars is supported by a comprehensive e-learning portal, Moodle. The resources on Moodle include links to websites, our e-databases, electronic books and tutor/ librarian produced materials. There are sections for each module of study which focus on specific module content, including a module handbook with assessment details, reading lists, workshop and seminar tasks. Each module is divided into a weekly breakdown of materials and specific resources. The online resources may include lecture PowerPoint’s, lecture hand-outs, television programmes, web links, video clips, MCTs and other materials. Written assessments are submitted to Moodle and the submission goes through Turnitin (plagiarism detection software). Our primary intention is not to use Turnitin as a punitive tool but as part of the learning process. To that end, you can submit and re-submit your work to Turnitin as many times as you wish prior to the end submission date, and through this process you may identify referencing points that require rectification. All tutors have access to Skype and this can be utilised inside and outside of the classroom. You may use this tool to have discussions with us throughout the year. Both Skype and Moodle also have messaging tools to assist communication to students, either as a group or to individuals. Teaching will be delivered through a combination of Lectures, Workshops and Seminars. Lectures will be interactive, with question and answer sessions and other forms of student involvement. Workshops are designed to enhance individual learning in relation to a common end task [the set seminar task(s)], which will then be explored in further detail with the tutor in the seminar. The individualised workshops may have you practicing timed essays, whilst others are involved in peer discussion and support. Alternatively, they may be based on last minute preparation, viewing resources on the e- learning portal or even test their knowledge with multiple choice questions (MCQs). In the workshop, the onus is on you to identify your own learning requirements. The programme employs a plurality of assessment methods including assignments, examinations, dissertation, presentations, assessed moots, assessed negotiations, assessed client interview, 'soap box' debates, and portfolio submission. This plurality of assessment ensures that you will graduate with the skills and abilities required in employment, such as the ability to work under pressure and within short time constraints (examinations), and the ability to address a large audience (presentations). The programme will develop your communication skills eg in writing (assignments/portfolios) and communicating verbally (moots/client conference/negotiation). This knowledge and these skills are designed to be transferable to a variety of careers, whether such is within the legal professions or another realm such as commerce, public service or education.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

England
£8,750
per year
Northern Ireland
£8,750
per year
Scotland
£8,750
per year
Wales
£8,750
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Bradford College

Department:

School of Business and Law

TEF rating:

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What students say


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After graduation


We don't have more detailed stats to show you in relation to this subject area at this university but read about typical employment outcomes and prospects for graduates of this subject below.

What about your long term prospects?

Looking further ahead, below is a rough guide for what graduates went on to earn.

Accountancy

The graph shows median earnings of graduates who achieved a degree in this subject area one, three and five years after graduating from here.

£15k

£15k

£14k

£14k

£16k

£16k

Note: this data only looks at employees (and not those who are self-employed or also studying) and covers a broad sample of graduates and the various paths they've taken, which might not always be a direct result of their degree.

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This information is from the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

You can use this to get an idea of who you might share a lecture with and how they progressed in this subject, here. It's also worth comparing typical A-level subjects and grades students achieved with the current course entry requirements; similarities or differences here could indicate how flexible (or not) a university might be.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

This is from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey, based on responses from graduates who studied the same subject area here.

It offers a snapshot of what grads went on to do six months later, what they were earning on average, and whether they felt their degree helped them obtain a 'graduate role'. We calculate a mean rating to indicate if this is high, medium or low compared to other universities.

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Graduate field commentary:

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The Longitudinal Educational Outcomes dataset combines HRMC earnings data with student records from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

While there are lots of factors at play when it comes to your future earnings, use this as a rough timeline of what graduates in this subject area were earning on average one, three and five years later. Can you see a steady increase in salary, or did grads need some experience under their belt before seeing a nice bump up in their pay packet?

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