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Blackburn College

BA (Hons) English Language and English Literature with Foundation Entry

UCAS Code: QF01

Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons)

Entry requirements


UCAS Tariff

32

About this course


Course option

4.0years

Full-time | 2019

Our BA (Hons) English Language and Literature with Foundation Entry degree course is designed for students who want to study English Language and Politics, but don’t have the necessary formal qualifications to start the Honours degree programme just yet.

This English Language and Literature BA (Hons) course enables you to study both English Language and Literature equally at the same level. Don’t worry, studying joint honours doesn’t mean more work. You’ll study the same number of credits as a single honours student, but just take fewer modules in each of the subjects. There are lots of reasons why students choose a joint honours qualification. Just some include: that you have two subject areas of interest, that you want to explore something new alongside a core subject area or that you want to keep your career options open to a range of professions.

On this exciting and innovative Joint Honours programme you will also cover a broad range of contemporary issues in language. The course will introduce you to contemporary linguistic approaches to the study of language, aspects of linguistic structure and language variation in English. The introductory modules look at issues such as how our language changes according to the context in which it is being used, how men's and women's language use differs, how we acquire language and how and why it breaks down. You will also explore the history and diversity of the English Language, examine the impact of new media, such as the Internet, email and text messaging, develop your own web design skills and reflect on your own language use. You will gain the critical understanding, cultural awareness and analytical skills to prepare you for a career in a wide variety of sectors.

Our English Literature programme will introduce you to a range of literary themes, genres and theories. You will explore key trends and movements and develop an understanding of historical, thematic and interdisciplinary approaches to literary interpretation. The major historical periods are represented, as are influential, exciting and thought-provoking texts from all the major literary genres. You will benefit from a firm grounding in key works from the Anglophone canon, whilst also having the opportunity to develop specific interests in the study of contemporary literature across a range of themes such as gender and race. You will gain the critical understanding, cultural awareness and analytical skills to prepare you for a career in a wide variety of sectors.

Modules

All students take a total of 120 credits per level.

Level 3 Modules (all modules are mandatory) include:
?Preparing for HE
?Foundation in English Language
?Foundation in English Literature

Level 4 Modules (all modules are mandatory) include:
?Introduction to English Language
?Language and Society
?Introduction to Literature
?Introduction to Literary Theory

Level 5 Modules (there are 3 mandatory modules and 3 optional modules out of a choice of 6 as indicated by *) include:
?Language Style and Communication
?Psycholinguistics
?Shakespeare

Choose 1 English Language module from the optional modules below:
?Discourse Studies*
?Cognitive Linguistics*

and choose 2 History modules from the optional modules below:
?Romantic Writings*
?Victorian Novel*
?Victorian Poetry*

Level 6 Modules (there is 1 mandatory module and 4 optional modules out of a choice of 9 as indicated by *) include:
?Dissertation

Choose 2 English Language modules from the optional modules below
?Language, Identity and Communication*
?Critical Approaches to text analysis*
?Language and Power*
?Discourse and Cognition*

and choose 2 History modules from the optional modules below:
?Critical Approaches to Poetry
?Development of Children's Literature
?Post- 1945 Fiction
?Post- 1945 Drama

Assessment methods

Modules in at Level 4 study are assessed by both examinations (50%) and coursework (50%). Level 5 and 6 modules are also assessed by examination and coursework combinations. You can also expect to take part in seminar presentations which will form part of the assessment for Level 5 and 6 modules. In the third year, you will undertake a dissertation which is assessed through coursework (100%).

Each module is formally assessed through, for example, examination, open-book test, individual and group presentation, essay, observation of practice, assessment of course work e.g. art portfolio, written report, reflective practice and portfolios of evidence. This formal assessment will count towards your module mark and feedback is usually given within 3 weeks following the submission of your formal submission of work.

Additionally, some lecturers will provide informal feedback, for example, following an examination they may choose to work through the exam paper in a tutorial. It should be noted that feedback is part of the ongoing learning cycle which is not limited to written feedback. Other forms of feedback include one-to-one meetings with a personal tutor, dissertation and project supervision meetings, a lecturer responding to learner questions or responses during topic or situation discussions.

Feedback is intended to help you learn and you are encouraged to discuss it with your module tutor.

The Uni


Course location:

Blackburn College

Department:

Art and Society

TEF rating:

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