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Birkbeck, University of London

Environmental Geology

UCAS Code: Not applicable

Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons)

Entry requirements


Access to Higher Education Diploma with a minimum of 15 credits achieved at Merit or Distinction in a science-based subject.

We welcome applicants without traditional entry qualifications as we base decisions on our own assessment of qualifications, knowledge and previous work experience. We may waive formal entry requirements based on judgement of academic potential.

About this course


Course option

4years

Part-time | 2019

Subject

Geology

Are you interested in geology and environmental issues? Are you concerned about the natural environment of our planet? Perhaps you work, or want to work, in the environmental or civil engineering industries. This course allows you to combine your studies and consider issues such as pollution, water resources, planning and waste disposal. As well as attending the course at Birkbeck in central London, you can also study by distance learning via our online learning environment, so you can access course materials and recordings of lectures wherever you are in the world - and whenever it suits you.

We are one of the few departments that meets the Geological Society's recommendation of a minimum of 100 days of fieldwork in a BSc programme. This is a commitment that many full-time courses do not match and, at present, we are the only part-time geology programme that does.

Each year, students attend a major residential field course of 10-14 days. They also attend numerous one-day and weekend field trips and are encouraged to undertake a substantial amount of independent field research.

Field courses are designed to complement the lecture programme and laboratory-based practical classes. In the field, you have the opportunity to cement your theoretical understanding of geology with practical experience. At the same time, you develop the skills you need to pursue independent research. We regularly update our field itineraries to keep up with changes in our curriculum. Currently, we take students to the Isle of Skye (Year 1), North-West Scotland (Year 2), and Cyprus and Spain (Years 3 and 4).

Highlights

- Our Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences has been offering evening study courses for over 70 years.

- You will learn in an environment of active research and be taught by lecturers who are working at the forefront of their specialisms.

- Our teaching is informed by considerable research into environmental issues, which is ongoing in the Department. Current research focuses on areas such as metal pollution, coastal erosion, mineralogy, earthquake prediction and palaeontology.

- We retain close links with UCL's Department of Earth Sciences, sharing expertise, facilities and events across the two institutions, including live streaming of lectures and digital lecture notes. In our joint submission with UCL, Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences at Birkbeck were rated sixth in the UK in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF).

- We are part of the joint UCL-Birkbeck Institute of Earth and Planetary Sciences (IEPS).

- We offer residential field trips to sites in Greece, Morocco, Scotland, Spain and Wales.

Modules

In Years 1 and 2, you will share compulsory modules with the BSc Geology. Once these are completed, you choose from a range of option modules that concentrate on specific environmental aspects. You may also choose modules in other subjects offered by Birkbeck to complement your geological studies or to broaden your scientific background and skills. You will also complete an environmental project.

Year 1 compulsory modules:
• Assessed Field Techniques 1
• Earth History
• Foundations of Mineralogy
• Introduction to Geochemistry
• Introduction to Geology
• Invertebrate Palaeontology

Year 2 compulsory modules:
• Assessed Field Techniques 2
• Geophysics
• Igneous Petrology
• Metamorphic Petrology
• Principles of Sedimentology
• Structural Geology I

Years 3 and 4 core/compulsory modules:
• Assessed Field Techniques 3
• Assessed Field Techniques 4
• Geological Hazards
• Project BSc Environmental Geology

Years 3 and 4 option modules:
• Chemical Evolution of the Earth
• Chemistry and Pollution of Water, Soil and Air
• Earth's Resources and Raw Materials
• Exploration Geophysics
• Forensic Geology
• Global Tectonics
• Introduction to Astrobiology
• Magmatic Processes
• Palaeoecology
• Petroleum Geology
• Scientific Computing and Data Modelling
• Structural Geology II
• Tectonic Geomorphology
• Vertebrate Palaeontology
• Volcanism in the Solar System

Assessment methods

Assessment is an integral part of your university studies and usually consists of a combination of coursework and examinations. You will be given time to complete coursework and prepare for exams.

Tuition fees

Select where you currently live to see what you'll pay:

Channel Islands
£6,935
per year
England
£6,935
per year
EU
£6,935
per year
International
£10,275
per year
Northern Ireland
£6,935
per year
Scotland
£6,935
per year
Wales
£6,935
per year

The Uni


Course location:

Birkbeck, University of London

Department:

Earth and Planetary Sciences

TEF rating:

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What students say


We've crunched the numbers to see if overall student satisfaction here is high, medium or low compared to students studying this subject(s) at other universities.

92%
high
Geology

How do students rate their degree experience?

The stats below relate to the general subject area/s at this university, not this specific course. We show this where there isn’t enough data about the course, or where this is the most detailed info available to us.

Earth sciences

Teaching and learning

100%
Staff make the subject interesting
92%
Staff are good at explaining things
92%
Ideas and concepts are explored in-depth
83%
Opportunities to apply what I've learned

Assessment and feedback

Feedback on work has been timely
Feedback on work has been helpful
Staff are contactable when needed
Good advice available when making study choices

Resources and organisation

96%
Library resources
91%
IT resources
92%
Course specific equipment and facilities
92%
Course is well organised and has run smoothly

Student voice

Staff value students' opinions

After graduation


Sorry, no information to show

This is usually because there were too few respondents in the data we receive to be able to provide results about the subject at this university.

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Post-six month graduation stats:

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