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Bachelor of Arts (with Honours) - BA (Hons) years full-time 2018
Ucas points guide


% applicants receiving offers


  • Design studies
Student score
80% MED
% employed or in further study
99% HIGH
Average graduate salary
£18k MED
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level

This must include at least one A Level in a relevant creative subject.

Scottish Highers

This must include at least one Scottish Higher in a relevant creative subject. We also accept Scottish Advanced Higher's.

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

This must be in a relevant creative subject.

International Baccalaureate

International Baccalaureate English Language B or English Language and Literature A at Higher Level grade 4 or Standard Level grade 5 is acceptable to meet English language requirements.

UCAS tariff points

This must include at least one Level 3 qualification in a relevant creative subject.

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 105 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers


Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support


Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

There are no rules in illustration. On this course you’ll explore the excitement of the blurred boundaries between contemporary disciplines. You’ll challenge and interrogate the way we think about illustration, imagery and style. Illustration is a way of seeing and understanding the world. Through a variety of techniques, traditional and digital, you’ll discover how to connect and communicate with different audiences across a range of contemporary platforms. The course proposes a dynamic learning experience based upon critical discourse within a vibrant creative studio environment. Individual development is supported and nurtured through experimentation, exploration, innovation, and risk-taking. The progressive structure of the course promotes the development of visual thinking and autonomous individual learning. The course offers the opportunity for you to explore diverse outcomes, based upon a reflective and critical understanding of the historical and contemporary contexts in which illustration continues to evolve. The broad based ethos of the course does not prohibit specialism however, and you are encouraged to understand and locate your practice within a range of contexts. This breadth of practice is essential for an exciting dialogue that emerges from the more traditional ideas of illustration through to the newer emergence of challenging and exciting hybrid forms. Individual units are designed to be adaptive to the changing nature of contemporary practice and developing theoretical positions. You are supported in the development of a broad and diverse response to a range of strategies, processes and techniques. You will build an appropriate portfolio of skills for the development of your individual practice, potentially including drawing, printmaking, photography, animation, utilising both digital and analogue approaches. The curriculum acknowledges that the creative process is informed and nourished by your development as an independent, critically self-reflective learner. The Course Team consists of a range of active practitioners and this enhances the currency of the learning experience. Visiting lecturers and industry liaison members also place considerable emphasis on the realities of working within the professional environment and the wider creative community. You will graduate with the knowledge, professional skills and creative agility necessary to develop your individual practice. You will also be equipped with the necessary skills, knowledge and differentiated modes of learning that will enable you to pursue postgraduate study or related forms of employment within the creative industries. The course recognises that in order to remain alert to the ever changing demands of a dynamic subject area, you are required to be flexible, inclusive, proactive, reflexive and progressive practitioner, graduating from the course fully equipped to be a pioneer within your chosen field.


Arts University Bournemouth


The Arts University Bournemouth is one of the most successful and popular higher education specialists in the UK, with an excellent national and international reputation; it is committed to providing the highest quality, industry-relevant creative degrees. It currently offers more than 20 degrees in art, design, media and performance.

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

The percentages below relate to the general subject area at this uni, not to one course. We show these stats because there isn't enough data about the specific course, or where this is the most detailed info made available to us.

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were taking courses within this subject area about things such as the quality of facilities and teaching - useful to refer to when you're narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether overall satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 83%
Student score 80% MED
Able to access IT resources


Staff made the subject interesting


Library resources are satisfactory


Feedback on work has been helpful


Feedback on work has been prompt


Staff are good at explaining things


Staff value students' opinions



Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
15% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
72% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
1% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
392 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
60% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
6% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 99% HIGH
Average graduate salary £18k MED
Graduates who are sales, marketing and related associate professionals


Graduates who are design occupations


Graduates who are other elementary services occupations


Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Want to work in a growing, creative sector where we are a world leader? Welcome to design! The UK has a proud reputation as a centre of design excellence, and last year just over 14,000 design degrees were awarded. At the moment, the jobs market looks a little better for fashion and textile designers, and not as good for multimedia or interactive designers — but that may change by the time you graduate. In general, design graduates are more likely than most to start their career in London, although that also varies by subject — last year fashion designers often found jobs in the North West, graphic designers in the South West, illustrators in the South West, East Anglia and Midlands, textile designers in the Midlands and the North West, and visual designers in Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Midlands. Design is also a good degree for people who want to work for a small business - more than half of graduates start at a small employer.
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