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BA (Hons) 3 years full-time 2017
Ucas points guide

80-96

% applicants receiving offers

52%

Subjects
  • Design studies
Student score
82% MED
% employed or in further study
81% LOW
Average graduate salary
£15k LOW
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
Not Available

(Art & Design at grade C or Media Studies at grade C),

Scottish Highers
Not Available

Any Art/Design subject.

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

UCAS tariff points
80-96

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 80-96 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

52%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,250

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Our BA (Hons) Fashion Design will take you out of your comfort zone, and help you forge a fresh identity as a fashion designer. You will be free to experiment with your own designs from the very start of the course, receiving regular support and feedback on your work from our teaching staff, who were rated joint 1st in the UK for â??satisfied with teachingâ?? and 2nd for â??satisfied with feedbackâ?? in the Guardian University Guide 2017. Our commitment to feedback will help you reflect on your work and develop your own unique style, making you stand out from the crowd. Our modules â?? taught by specialist tutors â?? take in all aspects of the design process, including the latest techniques in pattern cutting, draping, textiles and digital media, but will also allow you to explore business practices such as marketing and trend forecasting. As well developing your own individual approach to design work and discovering new directions for self-expression, you will graduate with a broad knowledge of the fashion industry, benefit from networking and collaboration within Cambridge School of Art (with, for example, photography students) and have the chance to explore your entrepreneurial side. With out-of-hours access to all of Cambridge School of Artâ??s industry-standard facilities - not just the fashion workshops - you can approach your work with flexibility. Weâ??ll provide training on any process that you want to use, as and when you need it. You will have the chance to find placements and internships with high-profile fashion houses including Alexander McQueen, French Connection and Vivienne Westwood; attend trade fairs, such as Pure in London (the UKâ??s leading fashion buying event) or the fabric and trend show Premiere Vision in Paris; and visit suppliers and other businesses connected with the fashion industry.

Modules

Year 1: Core modules: Introduction to fashion design 1 and 2; introduction to pattern cutting; introduction to surface textiles; 20th century design history; digital media 1. Year 2: Core modules: Development in fashion design; pattern cutting, draping and construction; pattern construction. Optional modules: Anglia language programme; business in the creative arts; time based media (filmmaking); installation practise; surface textiles; contemporary film and video; identities; issues in contemporary design; writing for images. Year 3: Core modules: Major project; research project; specialised practice in fashion design.

Anglia Ruskin University

Lord Ashcroft Building

Anglia Ruskin University is a progressive university, breaking into the top 350 educational institutions in the World in 2017*. ARU's fantastic academics will link theory with practice in a friendly and supportive environment; just one of the reasons that ARU's students have recorded some of the highest satisfaction rates across the University. With a campus in the very heart of the City of London offering you unprecedented access to a host of potential employers and careers, ARU London is the perfect place for you to build the skills and gain the knowledge which will propel you to a successful career. 
 

* The Times World University Rankings 2017

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 84%
Student score 82% MED
Able to access IT resources

87%

Staff made the subject interesting

91%

Library resources are satisfactory

81%

Feedback on work has been helpful

82%

Feedback on work has been prompt

86%

Staff are good at explaining things

93%

Received sufficient advice and support

82%

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
21% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
76% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
18% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
298 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
65% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
12% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 81% LOW
Average graduate salary £15k LOW
Graduates who are design occupations

17%

Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

12%

Graduates who are artistic, literary and media occupations

10%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
The UK has a proud reputation as a centre of design excellence, and last year, design was behind only nursing in the number of graduates from UK universities with nearly 13,700. Not all areas of design have been affected equally by the recession, so bear this in mind when you look at the stats. At the moment, things are looking a little better for fashion and textile designers and not as good for interior or multimedia designers – but that may change by the time you graduate. In general, design graduates are more likely than most to start their career in London. This also varies by subject – fashion designers often find jobs in the North West. Some employers in the field, particularly in London, are a little prone to asking graduates to work for free, so while it’s not the norm – one in nine design graduates from 2012 starting design jobs in London were working unpaid – it does go on.
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