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Anglia Ruskin University

Biomedical Science

UCAS Code: B940
Bachelor of Science (with Honours) - BSc (Hons) years full-time 2018
Ucas points guide


% applicants receiving offers


  • Microbiology
Student score
Not Available
% employed or in further study
Not Available
Average graduate salary
Not Available
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
Not Available

112 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 2 A Levels (or equivalent), including Biology.

Scottish Highers
Not Available

112 UCAS Tariff points from Scottish Highers are accepted, this must include a Pass in a related subject. 112 UCAS Tariff points from Scottish Advanced Highers are accepted, this must include a Pass in a related subject.

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

International Baccalaureate

This must include Biology at Higher level.

UCAS tariff points

UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of 2 A Levels (or equivalent), including Biology.

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 112 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers


Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support


Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Our Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS)-accredited course gives you a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of diagnosis and treatment of diseases and the underlying molecular and cellular biology, preparing you for a career in a range of biomedical fields. Biomedical science is fascinating. It is all about understanding how the human body works – both healthy and diseased. Our course will teach you the techniques and methodologies used to diagnose and monitor diseases, as well as how to identify treatments. You will cover key biological concepts starting from the molecular and cellular level, and encompassing human anatomy and physiology. Specialist aspects such as medical genetics and microbiology will be a part of your course; we will discuss how research in these field has impacted upon our lives, and its benefits and risks. Biomedical science overlaps with other disciplines, so we will explore how professionals from different teams work together. We will also look at the wider social, economic and ethical implications of biomedical science. By spending plenty of time in the lab, you will develop research, analytical and diagnostic skills. Through lectures and reading, you will develop your own ideas, then test them in practical experiments and critically review the results. We will introduce you to the statistics and software used in bioscience to enable you to analyse and present your data effectively. Your degree will culminate in a final year research project, which you will undertake in a field of your choice. Our facilities include specialist tissue culture and microbiology laboratories, as well as general teaching and research labs. We have an array of equipment such as thermal cycling equipment (for amplifying and quantifying DNA), flow cytometers, aggregometry (for measuring platelet aggregation), a range of microscopes including a confocal and a scanning electron microscope, and an intelliPATH immunohistochemistry slide-stainer. We maintain strong links to a number of hospitals within the NHS, and related industries within the East of England.


Year one, core modules Biomeasurement Core Biology Foundations of Cell Biology General Microbiology Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2 Introduction to Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Year two, core modules Diagnostic Techniques in Pathology Laboratory Techniques for the Biomedical Sciences Metabolism and its Control Physiology of Organ Systems Preparation for Research Principles of Genetics Principles of Pathology Year three, core modules Clinical Immunology Current Advances in Biomedical Science Human Pathology Medical Genetics Specialist Topics in Biomedical Science Undergraduate Research Project Year three, optional modules Biomedical Case Studies Microbial Pathogenicity Molecular Cell Biology

Anglia Ruskin University

Lord Ashcroft Building

Anglia Ruskin University is a progressive university, breaking into the top 350 educational institutions in the World in 2017*. ARU's fantastic academics will link theory with practice in a friendly and supportive environment; just one of the reasons that ARU's students have recorded some of the highest satisfaction rates across the University. With a campus in the very heart of the City of London offering you unprecedented access to a host of potential employers and careers, ARU London is the perfect place for you to build the skills and gain the knowledge which will propel you to a successful career. 

* The Times World University Rankings 2017

How you'll spend your time

Sorry, we don’t have study time information to display here

How you'll be assessed

Sorry, we don’t have course assessment information to display here

What do the numbers say for

The percentages below relate to the general subject area at this uni, not to one course. We show these stats because there isn't enough data about the specific course, or where this is the most detailed info made available to us.

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were taking courses within this subject area about things such as the quality of facilities and teaching - useful to refer to when you're narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether overall satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction Not Available
Student score Not Available

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.


Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
15% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
62% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
Not Available; ">
Not Available
Typical Ucas points
261 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
65% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
Not Available
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study Not Available
Average graduate salary Not Available

Sorry, we don't have any information about graduates from this subject here.

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
If you want a career in microbiology, then this is the degree to take. The recession hit the job market for microbiologists particularly badly, but things have improved very significantly since then, and microbiologists are now amongst the most employable biological sciences graduates. We don't produce many graduates in the subject every year and a lot take further qualifications on graduating. Microbiology graduates who want to leave the lab can find jobs in most industries - not just in health and hospitals, but in the food and drink, water and ecology sectors, too.
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