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Behind the scenes: how your uni application is processed

After all that time spent researching courses and redrafting your personal statement, you've sent your application off - and it's all gone very quiet. Should you be worried?

We asked admissions tutors from different universities what happens between them receiving your application and that eagerly anticipated Ucas Track update. 

How your uni application is processed

The journey your application makes once it’s received by an institution varies slightly depending on both the uni and the course, but typically it'll be seen by more than one pair of eyes often by both general admissions staff and academic tutors.
Applications are screened by our central admissions team then forwarded to academic admissions tutors who are able to view the full application electronically and make a decision. This decision is then checked by the central admissions team. Karen Hinton | Acting Head Of Student Recruitment - University Campus Suffolk (ucs)

Our admissions tutors work closely with a team of subject-focused admissions administrators to process the large volume of applications received to ensure that each is given the attention it deserves. In total, there are approximately 40 staff across the University who have responsibility for decision-making in their areas of expertise. Phil Dalby | Deputy Director Of Admissions - University Of Leicester

Decision time: what tutors are looking for

First up, tutors will check that you meet their entry criteria:
We look initially for applicants who meet the entry requirements for the course. This means looking at each individual application and seeing if they have the right amount of Ucas Tariff points for the programme and also the right subject knowledge. Louise Stow | Student Recruitment Manager - Bishop Grosseteste University

They’re looking for evidence that you’re really enthusiastic about the course:
Successful applicants are those who have researched carefully what subjects and grades they need to do their chosen course at their chosen universities, and have also clearly articulated in their personal statement why they want to study what they’ve applied for. Lynsey Hopkins | Admissions Manager (undergraduate) - University Of Sheffield
 

They've also got to weigh up your application against the competition:
We may determine who gets an offer based on the strength of the field. For highly selective courses, we may request additional information, for example a sample of work such as an essay you've written.  Admissions Staff | University Of East Anglia
See what makes an application stand out, according to tutors...
 

When you can expect to hear back

It depends on the university or department's approach. Here's what a few different unis told us: 

  • University of Leicester: 'Our aim is to process undergraduate applications within 20 days.'
  • Anglia Ruskin University: 'Within five days for non-interview courses.'
  • University of East Anglia (UEA): 'If we have a course that has a very specific number of spaces, we look at all the applications (as a 'gathered field') before determining with the admissions director who receives an offer.'
And as the University of Sheffield summed up, 'the main thing is to get the decision right: we always prioritise making good decisions over making speedy ones.'

However, all the universities we spoke to said that there are certain times in the year when they may take longer to respond due to the volume of applications. 

Applications for certain courses take longer than others 

For competitive courses like medicine and dentistry, or those requiring an interview or audition, it's likely it'll take universities longer to respond.
Decisions take longer for programmes where an interview is mandatory – primary education, journalism and some sports courses, for instance. Emma Brier | Assistant Academic Registrar (student Administration) - Leeds Trinity University

You could receive an offer for a different course

Sometimes applicants don’t meet the criteria for the course they’ve applied for, but there’s another course which is interested in them and which has slightly different criteria.

We consider that making a change-of-course offer is better for the applicant than simply not accepting them at all, as at least it gives them another option - possibly even something they might not have thought about before. Lynsey Hopkins | Admissions Manager (undergraduate) - University Of Sheffield

Waiting for offers: tips from tutors

A few final words from universities...

  • 'October to January is the peak application processing period for most admissions teams, so try not to panic if you're waiting for more than four weeks.'
  • 'Make sure you let universities know if you change your email address, phone number or move.' 
  • 'Respond to requests for additional information immediately.'


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