University of Warwick

Classical Civilisation

Ways to study this course – UCAS Code: Q820
BA (Hons) 3 years full-time 2014
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UCAS points guide Tuition fee % applicants receiving offers

320

£9,000

89%

Subjects Student score % employed or in further study Average graduate salary
Classical studies
MEDIUM 85% MEDIUM 86% MEDIUM £16.7k

What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

Scottish Highers None stated
BTEC Diploma None stated
UCAS tariff points None stated

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 320 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,000

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in…

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,465 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,465 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest

% applicants receiving offers

89%

This can indicate the level of competition for places on this course, but a high percentage doesn’t guarantee that you’ll get one, and vice versa.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

On this course, students take compulsory core modules in Greek culture and society, and Roman culture and society in the 1st year. Students choose between a variety of optional modules. In subsequent years students may pursue the themes of these modules further. The 2nd year core module the Hellenistic world maps new political and cultural developments beyond Classical Greece, bridging the gap between Classical Athens and Imperial Rome. Students may then choose their own path through the rest of the degree, through a variety of optional modules and a dissertation. Students may also continue learning ancient languages.

Modules

Year 1: Greek culture and society; roman culture and society; Greek language or Latin language; introduction to Greek and roman history or introduction to ancient philosophy. Year 2: Hellenistic world. Year 3: Dissertation. Year 2 and 3 optional modules: Ancient history (list a); Alexander the great; city of Rome; democracy and imperialism; early Christianity; food and drink in the ancient Mediterranean; history of medicine in the ancient world; receptions of antiquity: east and west; roman economy; the roman empire from Tiberius to Hadrian; transformation of roman society under Augustus; world of late antiquity; the roman empire from Antoninus Pius to Constantine; archaeology, art, architecture (list a); art and architecture of Asia minor; coinage of Greece and Rome; domestic space in the roman world; principles and methods of classical archaeology; roman near east; art and architecture of archaic and classical Greece; literature in translation or the original language (list b); art and death in neronian culture; epic and epyllion; the ancient world in film and popular culture; classical views of literature and the visual arts (available as Latin text option only); Greek comedy; Greek tragedy (available as Greek text option); origins of the modern novel (available as Latin text option); politics and poetics in Greek and Latin literature; sexuality and gender in antiquity (available as Greek text option); Greek and Latin texts in the original (list b); Greek language and literature; Greek literary texts; Latin language and literature; Latin literary texts.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
21%
79%

Year 1

22%
78%

Year 2

16%
84%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
53%
47%

Year 1

58%
42%

Year 2

38%
62%

Year 3

University of Warwick

Warwick is a world-class University with a buzzing sense of community and vibrant social scene. Based in the heart of campus, Warwick Students' Union is the focal point of student life, with a recently refurbished and modern building and top-notch facilities for relaxing, partying, eating, drinking and welfare. We are one of the largest unions for clubs and societies in the UK.

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

Who studies this subject?

Sources: BestCourse4Me & HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK

0% of students here are from outside the UK

Drop-out rate

15% of students do not continue into the second year of their course

Full-time / Part-time

1% of students are part-time

Male / Female

66% of students are female

Achievement

75% of students achieved a 2:1 or above

Typical UCAS points

440 entry points typically achieved by students

Most popular subjects students studied before attending

Here's an idea of the academic background of students from the last five years, to give you a flavour of the type of people who take this subject.

History

52%

Most common grade was A (52%)

English Literature

48%

Most common grade was A (58%)

Classics

71%

Most common grade was A (72%)

What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 88%
Student score MEDIUM 85%

Able to access IT resources

89%

Staff made the subject interesting

92%

Library resources are satisfactory

77%

Feedback on work has been helpful

82%

Feedback on work has been prompt

95%

Staff are good at explaining things

95%

Received sufficient advice and support

83%

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study MEDIUM 86%
Average graduate salary MEDIUM £16.7k

Graduates who are information technology and telecommunications professionals

5%

Graduates who are business, finance and related associate professionals

5%

Graduates who are business, research and administrative professionals

5%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Around 1,150 graduates received classics degrees in 2012 and more than a quarter of those went on to further study, usually a Masters, and often in a different subject such as law, history or archaeology. Those who did go into work tended to find jobs in London or the South East, and be working in education, marketing and advertising or the finance industry. Personal contacts were particularly important for these graduates in finding their first job, so good networks may help your job search when the time comes.

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