University of Brighton

Fine Art (Critical Practice)

Ways to study this course – UCAS Code: W100
BA (Hons) 3 years full-time 2015
BA (Hons) 4 years part-time 2015
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UCAS points guide Tuition fee % applicants receiving offers

300

£9,000

32%

Subjects Student score % employed or in further study Average graduate salary
Fine art
HIGH 90% LOW 80% MEDIUM £16k

What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

BBB

BBB

Scottish Highers None stated

30

Applications assessed individually.

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 300 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,000

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in…

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,465 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,465 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest

% applicants receiving offers

32%

This can indicate the level of competition for places on this course, but a high percentage doesn’t guarantee that you’ll get one, and vice versa.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Unfortunately we don't have any UCAS course information to display.

Modules

Year 1: Art practice; communication and research skills; professional development; theoretical knowledge skills; historical and critical studies; documentation. Year 2: Art practice; historical and critical studies; professional development; documentation; post-studio practice. Year 3: Research and articulation; formal presentation; documentation; final essay; public exhibition.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
35%
65%

Year 1

28%
65%
7%

Year 2

9%
91%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
92%
8%

Year 1

100%

Year 2

67%
33%

Year 3

University of Brighton

Since its inception in 1859, the University of Brighton has become an innovative and career focused institution with a thriving Student's Union and a 22,000 student population from all over the world. With over 150 years of experience in teaching and support, and over 100 million being invested into our facilities, we intend to continue to grow alongside our students.

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

Who studies this subject?

Sources: BestCourse4Me & HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK

2% of students here are from outside the UK

Drop-out rate

6% of students do not continue into the second year of their course

Full-time / Part-time

1% of students are part-time

Male / Female

64% of students are female

Achievement

59% of students achieved a 2:1 or above

Typical UCAS points

340 entry points typically achieved by students

Most popular subjects students studied before attending

Here's an idea of the academic background of students from the last five years, to give you a flavour of the type of people who take this subject.

English Literature

27%

Most common grade was A (29%)

Art and Design

91%

Most common grade was A (47%)

Art

20%

Most common grade was A (74%)

What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 93%
Student score HIGH 90%

Able to access IT resources

97%

Staff made the subject interesting

97%

Library resources are satisfactory

91%

Feedback on work has been helpful

81%

Feedback on work has been prompt

84%

Staff are good at explaining things

96%

Received sufficient advice and support

86%

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study LOW 80%
Average graduate salary MEDIUM £16k

Graduates who are artistic, literary and media occupations

10%

Graduates who are teaching and educational professionals

7%

Graduates who are sales assistants and retail cashiers

5%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Fine arts students, particularly some mature students, are more likely than students of many other subjects to have no need or desire to find work after their degree – quite a few students have already retired and are taking the degree for the excellent reason that they love art, and they're willing to pay to study it. You should bear this in mind if the stats you see feature particularly low employment rates. If you need to earn a living once you've finished your fine art degree, be aware that freelancing and self-employment is common, as are what is termed 'portfolio careers' – having several part-time jobs or commissions at once. Many courses help you prepare for freelancing. Over one in 10 of last year’s fine arts graduates had more than one job six months after graduation, over twice the average for graduates from 2012. Graduates from these subjects are often found in arts jobs, as artists, designers, photographers and similar jobs, or as arts and entertainment officers or teachers – although it's perfectly possible to get jobs outside the arts if you wish.

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