Ways to study this course – UCAS Code: Q100
BA (Hons) 3 years full-time 2015
default-alt-text
UCAS points guide Tuition fee % applicants receiving offers

360-400

£9,000

58%

Subjects Student score % employed or in further study Average graduate salary
Linguistics
HIGH 90% MEDIUM 93% HIGH £20.3k

What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

ABBe-AAAe

Scottish Highers None stated
UCAS tariff points None stated

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 360-400 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,000

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in…

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,465 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,465 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest

% applicants receiving offers

58%

This can indicate the level of competition for places on this course, but a high percentage doesn’t guarantee that you’ll get one, and vice versa.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Unfortunately we don't have any UCAS course information to display.

Modules

Year one: compulsory courses: logic and meaning; introduction to phonetics and phonology; introduction to generative grammar; introduction to children's language development; introduction to language. Year two: compulsory courses: two intermediate courses in each of the core areas of linguistics: meaning; pronunciation; sentence structure. Optional courses: language acquisition; practical phonetics; sociolinguistics; language processing; linguistics of sign language. Final year: compulsory courses: two courses each from two of the core areas of linguistics: meaning; pronunciation; sentence structure. Optional courses: linguistics options may include: language acquisition; practical phonetics; sociolinguistics; language processing; linguistics of sign language.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
20%
80%

Year 1

17%
83%

Year 2

14%
86%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
39%
61%

Year 1

16%
84%

Year 2

6%
88%
6%

Year 3

University College London, University of London

Welcome to University College London, the capital's leading multi-disciplinary university with 8,000 staff and 25,000 students. Our university is a modern, outward-looking institution, committed to engaging with the major issues of our times. We have a global reach - almost two-thirds of our student body come from outside the UK, from 150 countries. UCL today is a true academic powerhouse.

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

Who studies this subject?

Sources: BestCourse4Me & HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK

6% of students here are from outside the UK

Drop-out rate

15% of students do not continue into the second year of their course

Full-time / Part-time

0% of students are part-time

Male / Female

65% of students are female

Achievement

78% of students achieved a 2:1 or above

Typical UCAS points

450 entry points typically achieved by students

Most popular subjects students studied before attending

Here's an idea of the academic background of students from the last five years, to give you a flavour of the type of people who take this subject.

Mathematics

37%

Most common grade was A (60%)

English Literature

34%

Most common grade was A (68%)

English Language

59%

Most common grade was A (62%)

What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction 96%
Student score HIGH 90%

Able to access IT resources

100%

Staff made the subject interesting

88%

Library resources are satisfactory

100%

Feedback on work has been helpful

60%

Feedback on work has been prompt

92%

Staff are good at explaining things

100%

Received sufficient advice and support

79%

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study MEDIUM 93%
Average graduate salary HIGH £20.3k

Graduates who are teaching and educational professionals

4%

Graduates who are business, finance and related associate professionals

4%

Graduates who are health professionals

13%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
Linguists are in demand across the economy, from marketing to IT, so this type of degree has a better than average employment rate. Graduates from language subjects are, not surprisingly, more likely than most others to get jobs working overseas, with Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) a popular option. Linguists are particularly likely to get jobs in marketing, finance, education and in management, but remember – whilst employers say they rate language skills, you need to have them as part of a whole package of good skills.

© Which? 2014. All rights reserved