Leeds Beckett University

Biomedical Sciences (Physiology and Pharmacology)

UCAS Code: BB12
BSc (Hons) 3 years full-time 2017 | 2016
BSc (Hons) 5 years part-time 2017 | 2016
Ucas points guide

120

% applicants receiving offers

88%

Subjects
  • Anatomy, physiology & pathology
  • Pharmacology, toxicology & pharmacy
Student score
Not Available
Not Available
% employed or in further study
97% MED
Not Available
Average graduate salary
£21.2k MED
Not Available
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What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

A level
Not Available

Must include 40 points from a Biological Science; this can include Applied Science. If you are studying Biology, Chemistry or Physics to meet this requirement you must also achieve a `Pass? in the practical assessment, where that practical assessment is separated (from 2017). General Studies cannot be included in the minimum tariff points required.

Scottish Highers
Not Available

BTEC Diploma
Not Available

International Baccalaureate
26

Must include a Biological Science: this can include Applied Science.

UCAS tariff points
120

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 120 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

% applicants receiving offers

88%

Provided by UCAS, this is the percentage of applicants who were offered a place on the course last year. Note that not all applicants receiving offers will take up the place, so this figure is likely to differ from applicants to places.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,000

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in:

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,805 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,810 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest
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Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Focus on how the human body functions in health, how different drugs are used for the treatment of diseases and what effect they have on the body. You will understand how knowledge of pharmacological principles can inform the development of drug products that are of potential benefit in treating disease. You will also develop a comprehensive knowledge of the ways in which disturbances to homeostasis can relate to illness. Years two and three will see you study the modules Medical Physiology, Understanding Disease, Pharmacological Treatment of Disease, Topics in Neurosciences and Drug Development & Toxicology.

Modules

Year 1 core modules: Introduction to biomedical sciences; biochemistry and molecular biology; microbial world; human physiology and genetics; principles of pharmacology; cell biology, haematology and immunology. Year 2 core modules: Understanding disease; pharmacological treatment of disease; medical physiology; professional scientific practice; research investigations. Year 3 core modules: Topics in neurosciences; enterprise in biomedical sciences; individual project; drug development and toxicology.

Leeds Beckett University

The Rose Bowl

Leeds Beckett is a fantastic university and one of the largest in the UK. It leads the field in many of its courses, particularly sport, with top facilities and university sports teams. Based between two campuses within Leeds, the union's bars and societies are the main student hubs, interacting perfectly with the city's vibrant nightlife. The uni even has sites in India and south-east Asia.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
27%
73%

Year 1

25%
75%

Year 2

28%
72%

Year 3

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
42%
56%
2%

Year 1

46%
46%
8%

Year 2

6%
87%
7%

Year 3

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction Not Available
Student score Not Available

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

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Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
19% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
52% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
1% of students are part-time
Typical Ucas points
370 entry points typically achieved by students
2:1 or above
85% of students achieved a 2:1 or above
Drop-out rate
0% of students do not continue into the second year of their course
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What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study 97% MED
Average graduate salary £21.2k MED
Graduates who are therapy professionals

83%

Graduates who are metal forming, welding and related trades

3%

Graduates who are secretarial and related occupations

3%

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
The stats here cover not just anatomy, physiology and pathology courses, but also neuroscience and physiotherapy. Physiotherapy is more popular than the other four subjects combined. So, a lot of the data you’re looking at is really for physiotherapists, who have a slightly lower unemployment rate than the other subjects in this topic, having seen job prospects improve significantly in the last 12 months. Anatomy and physiology graduates often take further study – usually moving on to a medical degree, whilst pathology graduates tend to go into work. Physiotherapy graduates mainly go straight into work, and a majority got into physiotherapy roles within six months of graduation in 2012, either in hospitals or private practice. If you fancy working for yourself, physiotherapists are rather more likely than the average graduate to start their career self-employed.
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What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction Not Available
Student score Not Available

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

?

Who studies this subject?

Source: HESA

Start building a picture of who you could be studying with by taking a look at the profile of people that have studied this subject here in previous years.

UK / Non-UK
19% of students here are from outside the UK
Male / Female
52% of students are female
Full-time / Part-time
1% of students are part-time

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

Icon ribbon

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study Not Available
Average graduate salary Not Available

Sorry, we don't have any information about graduates from this subject here.

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
As only a relatively small number of students study pharmacology or toxicology, these statistics refer most closely to the graduate prospects of pharmacy graduates, so bear that in mind when you review them. Only a handful of students take first degrees in pure toxicology every year – the subject is more popular at Masters level. Pharmacology is in demand with the pharmaceutical and medical industries alike and there are some worries about whether the UK is producing enough graduates, though of late, unemployment rates have actually been a little high. Jobs in pharmacology are often very specialist and so it’s no surprise that pharmacologists are amongst the most likely of all students to go on to a doctorate – if you want a job in research, start thinking about a PhD. As for pharmacy, although there have been some concerns expressed about whether opportunities have kept pace with a subject that has rapidly increased in popularity, unemployment rates are ultra-low and over 95% of working pharmacy graduates had jobs as pharmacists (mostly as retail pharmacists) six months after they left their courses; telling you that these are degrees in demand.
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