Aston University

Product Design and Management

Ways to study this course – UCAS Code: H773
BSc (Hons) 3 years full-time 2015
BSc (Hons) 4 years full-time, sandwich 2015
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UCAS points guide Tuition fee % applicants receiving offers

300-320

£9,000

83%

Subjects Student score % employed or in further study Average graduate salary
Design studies
No Data No Data No Data

What do you need to get in?

Source: UCAS

Main entry requirements

No entry details provided

(Any Science subject or Any Technology subject).

No entry details provided

(Any Science subject or Any Technology subject).

DDD

Relevant subject

32

Including a science subject at Higher Level

If your qualifications aren’t listed here, you can use our UCAS points guide of 300-320 and refer to the university’s website for full details of all entry routes and requirements.

The real story about entry requirements

Tuition fee & financial support

£9,000

Maximum annual fee for UK students. NHS-funded, sandwich or part-time course fees may vary.

If you live in…

  • Scotland and go to a Scottish university, you won’t pay tuition fees
  • Northern Ireland and go to an NI uni, you’ll pay £3,465 in tuition fees
  • Wales you’ll pay £3,465 in fees and get a tuition fee grant to cover the rest

% applicants receiving offers

83%

This can indicate the level of competition for places on this course, but a high percentage doesn’t guarantee that you’ll get one, and vice versa.

What does the numbers of applicants receiving course offers tell me?

Will this course suit you?

Sources: UCAS & KIS

Every degree course is different, so it’s important to find one that suits your interests and matches the way you prefer to work – from the modules you’ll be studying to how you’ll be assessed. Top things to look for when comparing courses

Course description

Are you passionate about new ideas? Do you get excited when you discuss what you would like to make? To design is to create something new. This requires innovative thinking. Looking at products do you sometimes say “I could have designed this better”? Do you want to work in an innovative and enterprising arena that would challenge your creative and problem-solving abilities? Our Product Design programmes offer all these opportunities. The management of Product Design is a rapidly developing career. You will acquire business management skills together with other Product Design modules.

Modules

Year 1: Core modules: materials and processes; design principles; industrial design; communications and CAD; mathematics; information technology; sustainable process technology; business environment; financial accounting; mechanical engineering fundamentals; design projects (2 modules). Year 2: Core modules: industrial design 2; project modelling; new product proposal; design for manufacture; design project; ergonomics; quality engineering; management accounting; marketing principles; law; innovation management. Year 3: Optional work placement. Final year: Human resource management; manufacturing logistics; market analysis; environmental management and audit.

How you'll spend your time

  • Lectures / seminars
  • Independent study
  • Placement
22%
78%

Year 1

28%
72%

Year 2

100%

Year 3

27%
73%

Year 4

How you'll be assessed

  • Written exams
  • Coursework
  • Practical exams
12%
70%
18%

Year 1

19%
78%
3%

Year 2

10%
90%

Year 3

80%
20%

Year 4

Aston University

At Aston we are dedicated to developing people and ideas that will shape the businesses and communities of tomorrow. Aston is ranked as the top UK University outside London for graduate employability, and is in the top 10 UK universities for producing millionaires. The Aston Student Village is transforming accommodation and the redeveloped Woodcock Sports Centre offers top sports facilities.

What do the numbers say for

Where there isn’t enough reliable data about this specific course, we’ve shown aggregated data for all courses at this university within the same subject area

Who studies this subject?

Sources: BestCourse4Me & HESA

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

What do students think about this subject here?

Source: NSS

Here's how satisfied past students were – useful to refer to when you’re narrowing down your options. Our student score makes comparisons easier, showing whether satisfaction is high, medium or low compared to other unis.

What do student satisfaction scores tell you?

Overall student satisfaction No Data
Student score No Data

Sorry, not enough students have taken this subject here before, so we aren't able to show you any information.

What are graduates doing after six months?

Source: DLHE

Here’s what students are up after they graduate from studying this subject here. We’ve analysed the employment rate and salary figures so you can see at a glance whether they’re high, typical or low compared to graduates in this subject from other universities. Remember the numbers are only measured only six months after graduation and can be affected by the economic climate - the outlook may be different when you leave uni. What do graduate employment figures really tell you?

% employed or in further study No Data
Average graduate salary No Data

Sorry, we don't have any information about graduates from this subject here.

Employment prospects for graduates of this subject

Sources: DLHE & HECSU
The UK has a proud reputation as a centre of design excellence, and last year, design was behind only nursing in the number of graduates from UK universities with nearly 13,700. Not all areas of design have been affected equally by the recession, so bear this in mind when you look at the stats. At the moment, things are looking a little better for fashion and textile designers and not as good for interior or multimedia designers – but that may change by the time you graduate. In general, design graduates are more likely than most to start their career in London. This also varies by subject – fashion designers often find jobs in the North West. Some employers in the field, particularly in London, are a little prone to asking graduates to work for free, so while it’s not the norm – one in nine design graduates from 2012 starting design jobs in London were working unpaid – it does go on.

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